AN EXPLORATION OF SEGMENT ACCELERATION AND ANGULAR VELOCITY DURING DIFFERENT BALANCE CONDITIONS MEASURES IN THE ASSESSMENT OF STABILITY

Authors

  • Antoine Brabants Parnasse-ISEI
  • Jim Richards University of Central Lancashire
  • Kevin Deschamps Parnasse-ISEI
  • Jessie Janssen University of Central Lancashire
  • Ambreen Chohan University of Central Lancashire
  • Louise Connell University of Central Lancashire

Keywords:

Inertial measurement unit, Postural balance, Single-leg stance, Clinical Assessment

Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to identify the most sensitive measures to assess postural stability and to detect between leg differences.

 

Methods: Seventeen healthy volunteers participated in this University physiotherapy clinic experiment. Linear segment acceleration and segment angular velocity data were collected using Inertial Measurement Units on the left and right calcanei, shanks, and pelvis. Participants performed a 30s single-leg stance on a firm surface and a balance pad on their dominant and non-dominant leg. A two factor (2x2) repeated measures analysis of variance was used to compare the two balance surfaces and the leg dominance.

 

Results: Comparing the surfaces, both highest effect size and percentage difference were found in the pelvis angular velocity data. Apart from the anteroposterior linear acceleration of the shank, both effect size and percentage change showed that all average linear acceleration values were less sensitive to detect change between surfaces when compared to the average angular velocity values of the same body segments.

 

Conclusions: The angular velocity appeared to be more sensitive than the acceleration when differentiating between the two levels of stability challenge. Inertial measurement units measures have the potential to be used in the evaluation of postural stability and balance strategies within clinical assessment.

Author Biographies

Jim Richards, University of Central Lancashire

Pr. in Biomechanics

Allied Health Research Unit, School of Health Sciences, College of Health and Wellbeing, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK

Kevin Deschamps, Parnasse-ISEI

PhD

Division of Podiatry, Institut D'Enseignement Supérieur Parnasse Deux-Alice, Avenue Mounier 84, B-1200, Bruxelles, Belgium

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences-Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation Research Group, KULeuven, Tervuursevest 101, B-3001, Leuven (Heverlee), Belgium

Jessie Janssen, University of Central Lancashire

PhD

Allied Health Research Unit, School of Health Sciences, College of Health and Wellbeing, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK

Ambreen Chohan, University of Central Lancashire

PhD

Allied Health Research Unit, School of Health Sciences, College of Health and Wellbeing, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK

Louise Connell, University of Central Lancashire

PhD

Allied Health Research Unit, School of Health Sciences, College of Health and Wellbeing, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK

Published

2018-10-16

Issue

Section

Articles