Mapping knee skin surface sensitivity and temperature following cryotherapy

  • Jill Alexander, MSc University of Central Lancashire
  • James Selfe, DSc Department of Health Professions, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, UK UK.
  • David Rhodes, PhD Division of Rehabilitation Sciences, School of Health Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK.
  • Elizabeth Fowler, PhD Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
  • Karen May, MSc Division of Rehabilitation Sciences, School of Health Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK.
  • Jim Richards, PhD
Keywords: cryotherapy; cooling; knee; thermal imaging; skin sensation

Abstract

Objectives

To investigate the effects of cryotherapy on knee skin surface sensitivity and temperature using monofilaments and thermal imaging.

Methods

Following a 20-minute cryotherapy exposure (crushed ice), knee skin surface sensitivity and temperature was mapped in 19 healthy participants using infrared camera and tactile sensory evaluation. The data were collected before and up to 20 minutes after cryotherapy exposure.

Results

Comparing to baseline, in women, significant decrease in skin surface sensitivity in the upper medial section of photographic knee pain map was observed up to 20-minutes after cryotherapy exposure. In men, the respective difference was observed only immediately after the explosion.

Conclusions

Crushed ice application may reduce skin surface sensitivity around a knee medial aspect and result in impeding return to play due to affected joint position sense following cryotherapy.

 

Published
2019-03-11
Section
Articles